GEOG 483
Final Project

Introduction

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Final Project for Geography 483: Problem-Solving with GIS

Offered by: Penn State's Online Programs in Geographic Information Systems

Penn State's Certificate Program in GIS is an 11 credit program that takes approximately one year to complete. The Certificate Program is the first year of the Master of GIS (MGIS) Program.

The typical first year schedule that our students follow is:

GEOG 482: The Nature of Geographic Information (2 credits) or GEOG 864: Professionalism in GIS&T
GEOG 483: Problem Solving with GIS (3 credits)
GEOG 484: GIS Database Development (3 credits)*
GEOG elective (3 credits)
*final project opt-out option

An alternative schedule might be:

GEOG 482: The Nature of Geographic Information (2 credits) or GEOG 864: Professionalism in GIS&T
GEOG 484: GIS Database Development (3 credits)*
GEOG elective (3 credits)
GEOG elective (3 credits)
*final project opt-out option

Which option is best for me? For most the answer will be the typical first year schedule, which includes "GEOG 483: Problem Solving with GIS." A few others - particularly those with years of hands-on GIS experience - may not need to take GEOG 483 and register instead for 484. How to decide? Take a look at the Final Project, located in the Directions section to the right. If you already have the knowledge and skills needed to complete that assignment without taking the class, then we recommend you take "GEOG 484: GIS Database Development" instead. If you're not confident that you're ready for GEOG 484, be safe and take GEOG 483 first.

The lessons in Geography 483 cover vector and raster analysis, attribute and spatial queries, joins and links, buffers, address geocoding, cartographic design, thematic mapping, surface interpolation, and much more. The course is ten weeks in length and the final project spans the last three weeks of the course. The course overview of Geography 483 can be found here. https://www.e-education.psu.edu/geog483/syllabus

ArcGIS and Spatial Analyst are required to complete the project.

This site is part of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences' Open Education Resources (OER) initiative.
http://open.ems.psu.edu/