GEOG 882
Geographic Foundations of Geospatial Intelligence

Welcome to GEOG 882!

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New to GEOG 882?

Registered students should begin by reading through this page and then proceed to the Course and Program Orientation.

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Students who register for this Penn State course gain access to assignments and instructor feedback, and earn academic credit. Information about Penn State's Online Geospatial Education programs is available at the Geospatial Education Program Office.

The 2017 Fall 1 section of GEOG 882 will be taught by Dr. Gregory Thomas (gat5@psu.edu). The Fall 2 section will be taught be Dr. Mark Corson (mcw11@psu.edu). Please watch the following video (:43) that introduces Greg Thomas.

Quick Facts about GEOG 882

  • Overview - GEOG 882 is designed to challenge current and aspiring GEOINT professionals to be more than technicians. Students who successfully complete GEOG 882 will appreciate that while geospatial technologies are useful in revealing "what, who, where, and to some extent how" events are taking place, it is less useful in explaining "why" events occur, or what response is most appropriate. Students will learn that the political, cultural, historical, and economic perspectives of human geography are needed to put GEOINT analyses in context. The course will also challenge students to approach their analysis critically, to consider alternative viewpoints and explanations, and to question their own assumptions.
  • GEOG 882 is a required course in the Certificate Programs in Geospatial Intelligence as well as the Geospatial Intelligence option in the Master of Professional Studies in Homeland Security. The course is designed specifically for current and aspiring geospatial intelligence professionals who are able to study only part-time and at a distance, and is offered exclusively through the World Campus.

    Geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) leverages geographic information science and technology (including cartography, geographic information systems, remote sensing, and global positioning systems) with intelligence tradecraft to develop intelligence products that support national security, disaster response, and international relief efforts.

  • Learning Environment - This website provides the primary instructional materials for the course. The Resources menu links to important supporting materials, while the Lessons menu links to the course lessons. In addition, Canvas, Penn State's course management system, is used to support the delivery of this course and provides the primary communication, calendaring, and submission tools for the course.
  • Topics of Study - There are 10 lessons that will be completed at a rate of approximately 1 lesson per week.

    PART 1: INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND

    • Lesson 01: Introduction and Background
    • Lesson 02: Critical Frameworks
    • Lesson 03: Contemporary Thought

    PART 2: INTELLIGENCE AND NATIONAL SECURITY

    • Lesson 04: Intelligence Organization and Functions
    • Lesson 05: GIS&T and National Security
    • Lesson 06: Case Study of OEF/OIF

    PART 3: HOMELAND SECURITY AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT

    • Lesson 07: Disaster Management 1
    • Lesson 08: Disaster Management 2
    • Lesson 09: Case Study: Hurricane Katrina

    PART 4: TRENDS IN GEOSPATIAL INTELLIGENCE

    • Lesson 10: Trends in Geospatial Intelligence